Terena's Thoughts
Text size:

As a result of Julia Ricottone's cover article in the Summer Newsbrief, CNLA has received numerous responses relating to the impending skills gap in our industry and we thank you for your input.  One passionate member's response went above and beyond and we want to share her thoughts with you! In the next few Membership Updates, read Terena's Thoughts on possible solutions to the barriers facing apprenticeship programs in Canada.  

To comment on Terena's Thoughts or for more information about apprenticeship, please contact Stacey Porter (stacey@cnla-acpp.ca; or 1-888-446-3499, x8660).

"I have my Red Seal and am so proud to have it. I actively recruit for the apprenticeship program with Apprenticeship Manitoba on my own time. It literally blows my mind how low the numbers are when it is such as positive program for everyone involved. Last year was the first time in over 12 years where we had all three programs run at once here in Manitoba! It was worth all of the legwork and emailing needed to achieve that increase. I would be disheartened if the Landscape Horticulture Program dissolved. I give you my thoughts in hopes a difference can be made."  Terena Hantelman, RSE, is the Garden Centre Manager at Aubin's Nursery, an Instructor at Red River College, a Landscape Designer and a passionate advocate for apprenticeship. 

Barriers Facing the Apprenticeship Program:

1. OBSTACLES FROM EMPLOYERS
Resistance from employers because they feel like their staff will leave to start their own business after being trained.
  • Encourage and invest in staff and they will stay.
  • Have incentives for those that complete certification (of any sort).
  • Competition is a good thing. Quality workmanship and a good reputation will overcome most competition. If your employee wants to start a business encourage a specialization and work together to achieve a greater portion of the market. Encouraging the growth of a ‘sister’ company would benefit all involved. 

2. EMPLOYERS DON'T WANT TO PAY APPRENTICESHIP WAGES

  • Making employers more aware of the financial benefits from Apprenticeship and that a skilled and trained employee is worth the money they are paid.
  • Maybe clear spreadsheets showing this... Or facts/Stats promoting this. 
  • If a panel of apprentice employers was invited to speak to a group of employees considering apprenticeship, maybe these concerns could be addressed. 

3. EMPLOYERS NEED THESE GUYS FOR SNOW REMOVAL OR GREENHOUSE WORK IN THE WINTER

  • School term is only 11 weeks; sending someone away for a short time and having them come back as a skilled employeed should be worth an 11 weeks of inconvenience;
  • Investing in an employee has many returns;
  • Offer different shifts that accommodate the schooling.

4. EMPLOYERS CLAIM NO ONE WOULD BE INTERESTED, OR THEY HAVE NO LONG-TERM EMPLOYEES

  • How to secure long-term employees? I feel it comes down to showing appreciation and investing in employees. 
  • Most employees are unaware of schooling in the industry. Having an advertising campaign would be great!
  • Where to advertise?
    • Honestly in bathroom stalls at bars and lounges. Most landscapers will go for a beer after a long week.
    • At stadiums, sporting events. It's true most landscapers are men... and most men like sports.
  • If my employer ever suggested I go to school, I would be honoured and want to make them proud. I would feel they saw potential in me.
    • The jobs I left were because I felt under-appreciated or taken advantage of.
    • The jobs I stayed at I felt part of the team, I felt important

 

Bookmark and Share
Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Email Newsletter
Privacy by SafeSubscribe
For Email Marketing you can trust
Quick Links



Membership Directory

F
ind CNLA members

Landscape Industry Certified


Learn more about becoming a Landscape Industry Certified professional. Find test dates, study materials, and more. Follow us on Twitter!

Green Careers Canada

There are plenty of career opportunities in the field of horticulture. The Landscape industry has worked closely with the Ministries of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU), to provide education at the high school, college and university levels that give individuals the skills they need for a successful career in the industry.


National Awards of Landscape Excellence

Recognizing Canadian companies that raise the level of professionalism in the landscape industry.  2016 awards ceremony to be held in Kelowna, BC this August.


Garden Days

Canada’s coast to coast, three-day celebration of National Garden Day which is held annually on the Friday before Father’s Day.


National Tree Day


A day set-aside to celebrate Canada's greatest natural resource.  Happens the Wednesday of National Forest Week in September.

Canadian Standards for Nursery Stock

Minimum standards for the nursery industry, for use by students, educators and professionals.


Canadian Nursery Certification Institute

An independent industry body with a mandate to administer nursery certification programs in Canada.

 


CNLA on FacebookCNLA on TwitterCNLA on LinkedIn

Remodeling and Home Design